CCUS around the world

Featured pilot, demonstration, and early stage projects

In this report

In addition to the commercial CCUS facilities operating around the world today, there are a large number of CCUS pilot or demonstration projects as well as projects in earlier stages of development. Here we feature some globally-significant CCUS projects to highlight the breadth of activity across applications, sectors and regions.
Tomakomai CCS Demonstration Project
Tomakomai CCS Demonstration Project

The Tomakomai CCS Demonstration Project, Japan’s first full-chain CCS project, captured and stored CO2 from a coastal oil refinery on Hokkaido Island in Japan from 2016-2019. The refinery’s hydrogen production unit produces offgas containing about 50% CO2, which was captured in an active amine process. The project captured around 0.1 Mt CO2 during each year of operation for injection into two nearby offshore saline aquifers for storage and monitoring. In late 2019, the project achieved its demonstration target of 0.3 Mt of CO2 captured and ceased injection as planned. Monitoring of the stored CO2 will continue during the post-injection period.

The Tomakomai CCS Demonstration Project is led by Japan CCS Co. Ltd (JCCS), established in 2008 by major Japanese companies interested in advancing and testing CCUS technology and safety. The objective of JCCS is to implement and demonstrate CCUS projects in Japan, and to investigate associated technologies through international collaboration. The Tomakomai project was commissioned to JCCS in 2012 by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), and from 2018 by New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO).

Key metrics

Location

Tomakomai, Hokkaido Island, Japan

Operation date

2016-2019 (monitoring being continued)

Retrofit or new

Retrofit

Capture rate (Mtpa)

0.1

Sector

Hydrogen production

Feedstock

LPG

Primary storage type

Dedicated

Storage location

Offshore

Transport length (km)

0.2

Transportation type

Pipeline

Drax BECCS
Drax BECCS

Drax Power Limited operates two pilot bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) facilities at the Drax Power Station in North Yorkshire, UK, with plans for commercial-scale capture as of 2027. The existing power plant, which provides around 6% of the country’s electrical supply, has converted four of its six generating units from coal to renewable fuel and ceased commercial operation of the two remaining coal units in Q1 2021. 

The first pilot CO2 capture facility started operating in 2019, using capture technology from C-Capture. The project has the capacity to capture up to one tonne of CO2 per day. The second pilot started up in 2020 using technology from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, capturing around 300 kg CO2 per day to test the companies’ technology with biomass flue gases. The project is currently releasing the small quantities of CO2 from its pilot operations after its capture and has planning consent to provide CO2 for use with several partner companies. The long-term plan for the full-scale plant is for permanent geologic storage.

The commercial scale BECCS project from Drax would be part of the proposed Zero Carbon Humber CCUS hub in the UK. This project aims to create the world’s first net zero industrial cluster by 2040 using a new, purpose-built CO2 and hydrogen pipeline network. Industrial sites throughout the Humber will capture CO2 from electricity generation, hydrogen production or industrial processes and store their captured emissions offshore in geologic formations under the North Sea (with an initial capture capacity for the hub estimated at 17 MtCO2/year). By combining renewable electricity generation from biomass and CCS, Drax Power Station could become the world’s first carbon negative power station by 2027, supporting decarbonisation of the UK’s most carbon-intensive industrial region.

Key metrics

Location

Selby, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom

Operation date

2019: first pilot, 2020: second pilot, 2027: one of four generating units, 2030: two units

Retrofit or new

Retrofit

Capture rate

First pilot: 1 ton per day, Second pilot 0.3 tonnes per day

Sector

Power generation (biomass)

Feedstock

Biomass (compressed wood pellets)

Primary storage type

Dedicated (for commercial stage)

Storage location

Offshore

Transport length (km)

~100km

Transportation type

CO2 pipeline

Northern Lights
Northern Lights

When it starts operations in 2024, Northern Lights will be the first ever cross-border, open-source CO2 transport and storage infrastructure network. It will offer companies across Europe the opportunity to store their CO2 safely and permanently deep under the seabed in Norway. The company is building two dedicated CO2 carriers and will ship captured CO2 to an onshore terminal on the Norwegian west coast and, from there, transport it by pipeline to an offshore subsurface storage location in the North Sea. Phase one of the project will be completed mid-2024 with a capacity of up to 1.5 million tonnes of CO2 per year. The ambition is to expand capacity by an additional 3.5 million tonnes to a total of 5 million tonnes, dependent on market demand. However, the receiving terminal, offshore pipeline, and the umbilical to the offshore template will be built to accommodate the additional volumes. Both phases will offer flexibility to receive CO2 from European sources

Northern Lights is a partnership between Equinor, Shell and Total, and is a key component of Longship, the Norwegian Government’s full-scale carbon capture and storage project, which aims to capture and store approximately 0.8 Mtpa of CO2 by 2024 from a cement factory in Brevik and Fortum Oslo Varme, a waste-to-energy facility located in Oslo (subject to additional funding). The Longship project is a result of close cooperation between Gassnova, the state enterprie for (CCS), and the industrial partners. The Northern Lights partners finalised the design work and, along with the Norwegian Government, made positive final investment decisions in 2020.

The ability of Northern Lights to receive CO2 captured accross Europe means that it can play an important role in meeting not just Norway’s ambitious climate goals, but those of the entire region. It is linked to plans for at least nine potential capture facilities across Europe, including four cement factories and a steel plant. Plans to equip these facilities with CO2 capture are unlikely to materialise in the absence of a potential CO2 storage solution, illustrating the valuable role of hubs with shared transport and storage infrastructure in accelerating deployment of CCUS.

Key metrics

Location

North Sea and west coast of Norway

Operation date

2024

Retrofit or new

New

Storage capacity (Mtpa)

Phase one: 1.5, phase two: 5

Sector

Various

Feedstock

Various

Primary storage type

Dedicated

Storage location

Offshore

Transport length (km)

110 (from onshore receiving terminal)

Transportation type

Pipeline and ship