Energy Efficiency Indicators

Detailed energy consumption data across sectors and end uses

The IEA's Energy Efficiency Indicators database covers end use energy consumption for 8 energy products and includes end use energy efficiency indicators and carbon intensity indicators for 4 sectors (residential, services, industry and transport) for IEA member countries. These indicators are computed by using key sectorial activity data.

Having reliable data and indicators on how energy is used is key to informing and monitoring the effectiveness of energy efficiency policies. This comprehensive and disaggregated database provides valuable insights on the patterns of energy consumption at country level, and enables countries to keep track of efficiency improvements across sectors and end uses.

The IEA Energy Efficiency Indicators database is available in two versions. The short version is free and contains total final energy consumption by end use for selected years, with the indicators indexed to the year 2000. The extended version is more comprehensive and includes the disaggregation of end use energy consumption by energy product, as well as end use efficiency and carbon indicators for all the years between 2000 and 2015.

Download the documentation for this product (PDF).
Purchase the database Download the free short version Download the highlights

Sample data to 2014


Other industries includes agriculture, mining and construction. Passenger cars includes cars, sport utility vehicles and personal trucks

Transport efficiency

The indicators used to measure energy efficiency across these sectors are chosen to best represent energy efficiency in that context. For example in transportation, passenger transport intensity indicates the amount of energy used to move one passenger over a distance of one kilometre. Intensity levels vary across countries depending on the share of modes (e.g. road, air, water, rail), vehicle types in the mix (e.g. passenger cars, buses, etc.) and on the average occupancy (passengers per vehicle) – which in many countries has decreased over time as people increasingly drive their vehicles alone.

Passenger transport intensity is particularly high in countries like the United States, due to the large use of passenger cars (of which a high share are SUVs) and domestic flights as compared to more efficient transportation modes like buses and trains. Conversely, this indicator is comparatively low in countries like France, where rail transport is relatively common.

Residential efficiency

Looking at residential buildings, energy efficiency improvements for space heating are tracked by trends in residential space heating intensity – defined as energy consumption per floor area. This indicator significantly decreased in many IEA countries, for instance, Austria, France, Germany, Ireland, Korea, Netherlands and Spain have experienced reductions of more than 30% since 2000. Warmer countries generally have lower space heating intensities, as less energy is needed on average to keep the temperature inside residential buildings at a comfort level.

Manufacturing efficiency

For manufacturing, the average manufacturing energy intensity in a country depends on the relative weight of the different sub-sectors in the manufacturing mix. For example, the intensity is particularly high in countries like Finland, where the paper, pulp and printing industry – which is very energy-intensive – represented over half of total manufacturing energy consumption in 2014.

Overall, the manufacturing sector intensity has decreased over time across virtually all countries. For example, in the United States it decreased about 38% in the period 2000-2014, due to efficiency improvements mainly in the chemicals and basic metals sub-sectors, but also because of increasing shares of low energy-intensive sub-sectors, like machinery.

Purchase the database Download the free short version Download the highlights