Energy Technology Perspectives 2014 - Harnessing Electricity's Potential

 Now available for free download, click here: 

energy technology in ETP 2014Starting from the premise that electricity will be an increasingly important vector in energy systems of the future, Energy Technology Perspectives 2014 (ETP 2014) takes a deep dive into actions needed to support deployment of sustainable options for generation, distribution and end-use consumption. In addition to modelling the global outlook to 2050 under different scenarios, ETP 2014 incorporates the IEA's annual progress report on global efforts to engineer a clean-energy transformation. Moreover, ETP 2014 provides insight on many key questions about the future energy system, including:

  • How much will the transformation to a clean-energy system cost?
  • Is solar the answer to decarbonising the electricity supply?
  • How can technologies help continue to exploit the advantages of natural gas in a decarbonised energy system? 
  • Can electrification have a meaningful impact on transportation, and if so, how?
  • Is energy storage the game changer that many want to believe?
  • What will it take to reach high-efficiency power generation in India? 

Executive Summary  /  Table of Contents  /  Press release  

Executive Summary in other languages - Chinese / French / German / Japanese / Korean / Russian / Spanish

Energy Technology Perspectives 2014 - Webinar 13 June 2014

13 June 2014, Paris, France


Moderator: Markus Wråke from IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, former Energy Technology Perspectives Project Manager

IEA Presenters: Keith Burnard, David Elzinga, Jean-Francois Gagne, Steve Heinen, Sean McCoy, Luis Munuera, Cedric Philibert and Tali Trigg. 

The webinar focused on Harnessing Electricity’s Potential, with  insights on many key questions about the future energy system, including:

  • How much will the transformation to a clean-energy system cost and what are the financing challenges?
  • Is solar the answer to decarbonising the electricity supply?
  • How can technologies help continue to exploit the advantages of natural gas in a decarbonized energy system?
  • Can electrification have a meaningful impact on transportation, and if so, how?
  • Is energy storage the game changer that many want to believe? 
  • What will it take to reach high-efficiency power generation in India?

ETP 2014 Factsheets

Here you can find factsheets on specific topics from ETP 2014.

The Global Outlook

Energy Technology Perspectives 2014 (ETP 2014) charts a course by which policy and technology together become driving forces in transforming the energy sector over the next 40 years. Recent technology developments, markets and energy-related events have asserted their capacity to influence global energy systems. They have also reinforced policy’s central role in the increasingly urgent need to meet growing energy demand while addressing related concerns for security, costs and environmental impacts. Radical action is needed to transform energy supply and end use.

Global Outlook 

Electrification of the Global Energy System

Rapid evolution in the character of supply, coupled with the fact that growth in electricity demand is outpacing all other final energy carriers, requires increasingly strategic approaches to balance supply and demand. Power generation is responsible for roughly 40% of global CO2 emissions. Decarbonising the sector impacts the entire energy system and is crucial for achieving deep emissions cuts in a relatively short time, as required by 2050 in the 2DS. If achieved, the 2DS gives the world at least a 50% chance of keeping average global temperature rise from pre-industrial levels below 2°C.

Electrification of the Global Energy System

ETP 2014 Electricity by the Numbers

Almost 40% of global primary energy is currently used to generate electricity, and electricity generation produces nearly 40% of global energy-related CO2.
Final energy demand exhibits a different trend however: oil products continue to dominate, accounting globally for 40% of final energy demand in 2011 (particularly for transport). Electricity comes second, with a share of just 17% in the final energy demand mix, but is rapidly increasing emissions.

Electricity by the Numbers

Electricity Storage as a Game Changer?

ETP 2014 analysis casts doubt on recent claims that electricity storage will be a game changer, yet confirms its widespread value as a versatile tool. As a flexibility resource, storage can support grid balancing and facilitate access to electricity using renewable energy. However, the significant cost of many technologies for high-power and high-energy applications currently undermines the conceptual flexibility potential of storage compared with competing options. But storage is uniquely capable of delivering modularity, controllability and responsiveness.

Electricity Storage as a Game Changer

Power Generation in India

Very few countries have faced challenges of the magnitude that confront India in its quest to maintain strong economic growth while providing electricity to its 300 million citizens who now lack access. The country will need to tap all energy sources and technologies to meet the scale of energy demand projected over the next few decades. In establishing the framework for its low-carbon growth strategy, and with fossil fuels currently providing more than three-quarters of electricity generated, India will need to be mindful of environmental and social factors.

Power Generation in India