14th Session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and 4th Session of the Conference of the Parties to the Kyoto Protocol (COP 14/COP MOP 4)

Venue: Poznan, Poland

Dates: 1 December 2008 - 12 December 2008

Organiser: UNFCCC 

Contact Email: -

Background

High-Level StatementCOP14 Sticker Big
Clean Energy New Deal
IEA Climate change topic page
CO2 Capture and Storage
Policies and Measures Database
Annex I Expert Group
UNFCCC COP 14 website

IEA Official Side Event

"You say you want a revolution – energy policy and technology for a sustainable future”

Wednesday, 10 December 

Chair: Richard Bradley, Head of Energy Efficiency and Environment Division

  • Introduction - Nobuo Tanaka, Executive Director, IEA

 

IEA Day at COP14

Tuesday, 9 December 2008

Introduction
Richard Bradley, Head of Energy Efficiency and Environment Division

World Energy Outlook 2008: stabilization goals and the energy challenge 
Pawel Olejarnik, Office of the Chief Economist

Sectoral Approaches:  what role in a future mitigation regime? 
Richard Baron, Energy Efficiency and Environment Division

Price Caps and Price Floors in Climate Policy – a quantitative assessment
Cedric Philibert, Energy Efficiency and Environment Division

From Competitiveness to Carbon Leakage: myths and realities, solutions and pitfalls 
Julia Reinaud, Energy Efficiency and Environment Division

Electrical End-Use Energy Efficiency Policy: lighting, appliances, motors and utilities 
Paul Waide, Energy Efficiency and Environment Division

CO2 Capture and Storage: a key GHG abatement option 
Tom Kerr, Energy Technology Policy Division

CO2 Reduction in Transport:  what’s hot and what’s not
Lew Fulton, Energy Technology Policy Division

IEA Activities in Cleaner Fossil Fuels
Sankar Bhattacharya, Energy Technology Collaboration Division

Trends in Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  – insights from IEA indicator analysis
Peter Taylor, Acting Head of Energy Technology Policy Division

Global Technology Co-operation for Clean Energy; the IEA’s NEET initiative
Neil Hirst, Director, Global Energy Dialogue Directorate

 

WEO side event

Monday, 8 December 

Chair: Richard Bradley, Head of Energy Efficiency and Environment Division

  • Welcome by Polish Vice Minister of Environment, Mr. Janusz Zaleski 
  • Panel discussion

    - Mr Yvo de Boer (Executive Secretary, UNFCCC)
    - Mr Brice Lalonde (Ambassador for Climate Change, France)
    - Mr Harlan Watson (Ambassador for Climate Change, USA)
    - Ms Ritu Mathur (TERI, India)

  • Question and Answer Session

 

Fuel Economy "50 by 50" side event with International Transport Forum

The IEA participated in the COP side event hosted by the International Transport Forum, "50 by 50" on the topic of vehicle fuel economy. It was held December 12 from 18:00 to 19:30

In this "pre-launch" event, representatives of ITF, IEA and other partners will present the key features of the Global Fuel Economy Initiative (GFEI) -- a major forthcoming international initiative that aimed to facilitate large reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and oil use through improvements in automotive fuel economy in the face of rapidly growing car use worldwide. 

In this "pre-launch" event, the key features of the Global Fuel Economy Initiative (GFEI) were presented -- a major international initiative that aims to facilitate large reductions of greenhouse gas emissions and oil use through improvements in automotive fuel economy in the face of rapidly growing car use worldwide. 

GFEI will be launched in early 2009. It is sponsored jointly by the International Transport Forum, the International Energy Agency, the United Nations Environment Programme and the FIA Foundation. 

The initiative is based on the premise that a 50% improvement in average fuel economy (reduction in fuel consumption per kilometre) is achievable for the world-wide stock of light-duty vehicles, and in fact can be achieved cost-effectively by 2050. This relates to a 50% improvement in all new cars and other light-duty vehicles by 2030, with interim targets also under development. With efficiency-related flanking measures this could result in at least a stabilisation of CO2 emissions from the global car fleet, an important contribution to meeting the CO2 targets identified by the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and supported by G8 recommendations. 

The benefits will also include significant reductions in oil expenditures and reductions in urban air pollution around the world. The potential benefits are large and greatly exceed the expected costs of improved fuel economy. Cutting global average automotive fuel consumption (L/100 km) by 50% (i.e. doubling MPG) would reduce emissions of CO2 by over 1 gigatonne (Gt) a year and result in savings in oil import bills alone worth over USD 200 billion (based on an oil price of USD 50/bbl). 

The 50:50 Initiative proposes several steps and actions to work towards the overall goal and each step will achieve some of this overall benefit. The initiative has developed a core plan of activities and is developing linkages with other organisations and governments around the world to achieve its goal. The Global Fuel Economy Initiative aims specifically to improve the understanding of the potential for improving the fuel efficiency and reducing the CO2 emissions of cars around the world and provide guidance and support on the development of policies to promote fuel efficient vehicles.

For background information on the topic, you may wish to visit the following websites:

 

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