Previous World Energy Outlooks

The annual World Energy Outlook (WEO) is now the world’s most authoritative source of energy market analysis and projections, providing critical analytical insights into trends in energy demand and supply and what they mean for energy security, environmental protection and economic development. The WEO projections are used by the public and private sector as a framework on which they can base their policy-making, planning and investment decisions and to identify what needs to be done to arrive at a supportable and sustainable energy future.

World Energy Outlook 2015

Big questions abound in global energy in 2015:

• Could oil prices stay lower for longer? What would it take for this to happen and what would it mean for energy security and for the energy transition?
• India is set for a period of rapid, sustained growth in energy demand: how could this re-shape the energy scene?
• What do new climate pledges mean for the way that the world meets its rising needs for energy?
• What are the implications of the rising coverage of energy efficiency policies and the growing competitiveness of renewables?
• Is the unconventional gas revolution going to go global, or to remain a North American phenomenon?

These issues – and many more – are discussed here, with a special focus on India accompanying the customary, in-depth WEO analysis of the prospects for all fossil fuels, renewables, the power sector and energy efficiency around the world to 2040.

World Energy Outlook 2014

• Does growth in North American oil supply herald a new era of abundance – or does turmoil in parts of the Middle East cloud the horizon?
• Does the expansion of LNG trade offer the prospect of greater security in global gas supply?
• How much can energy efficiency close the competitiveness gap caused by differences in regional energy prices?
• What considerations should shape decision-making in countries using, pursuing or phasing out nuclear power?
• How can sub-Saharan Africa’s energy sector help to unlock a better life for its citizens?
• How close is the world to using up the available carbon budget, which cannot be exceeded if global warming is to be contained?

Answers to these questions and a host of others are to be found in the pages of WEO-2014, based on new projections which are extended, for the first time, to 2040. The energy prospects of sub-Saharan Africa are analysed comprehensively and the state and prospects of nuclear energy examined in depth, all as part of a systematic analysis of developments in global energy across all fuels and nations.

World Energy Outlook 2013

• In a world where big differences in regional energy prices impact competitiveness, who are the potential winners and losers? 
• Huge volumes of oil are needed to meet growing demand and offset declines in existing fields. Where will it all come from?
• What could trigger a rapid convergence in natural gas prices between Asia, Europe and North America, and how would it affect energy markets?
• Is the growth in renewable energy self-sustaining and is it sufficient to put us on track to meet global climate goals? 
• How much progress is being made in phasing out fossil-fuel subsidies and expanding access to modern energy services to the world’s poor?

The answers to these and many other questions are found in WEO-2013, which covers the prospects for all energy sources, regions and sectors to 2035. Oil is analysed in-depth: resources, production, demand, refining and international trade. Energy efficiency – a major factor in the global energy balance – is treated in much the same way as conventional fuels: Its prospects and contribution are presented in a dedicated chapter. And the report examines the outlook for Brazil’s energy sector in detail and the implications for the global energy landscape.

World Energy Outlook 2012

Industry and government decision makers and others with a stake in the energy sector all need WEO-2012. It presents authoritative projections of energy trends through to 2035 and insights into what they mean for energy security, environmental sustainability and economic development.

Oil, coal, natural gas, renewables and nuclear power are all covered, together with an update on climate change issues. Global energy demand, production, trade, investment and carbon-dioxide emissions are broken down by region or country, by fuel and by sector.

Special strategic analyses cover:

• What unlocking the purely economic potential for energy efficiency could do, country-by-country and sector-by-sector, for energy markets, the economy and the environment
• The Iraqi energy sector, examining both its importance in satisfying the country’s own needs and its crucial role in meeting global oil and gas demand
• The water-energy nexus, as water resources become increasingly stressed and access more contentious
• Measures of progress towards providing universal access to modern energy services
• There are many uncertainties; but many decisions cannot wait. The insights of WEO-2012 are invaluable to those who must shape our future

World Energy Outlook 2011

World Energy Outlook 2011 brings together the latest data, policy developments, and the experience of another year to provide robust analysis and insight into global energy markets, today and for the next 25 years. This edition of the IEA’s flagship WEO publication gives the latest energy demand and supply projections for different future scenarios, broken down by country, fuel and sector. It also gives special focus to such topical energy sector issues as:

Russia’s energy prospects and their implications for global markets.

• The role of coal in driving economic growth in an emissions-constrained world.
• The implications of a possible delay in oil and gas sector investment in the Middle East and North Africa.
• How high-carbon infrastructure “lock-in” is making the 2°C climate change goal more challenging and expensive to meet.
• The scale of fossil fuel subsidies and support for renewable energy and their impact on energy, economic and environmental trends.
• A “Low Nuclear Case” to investigate what a rapid slowdown in the use of nuclear power would mean for the global energy landscape.
• The scale and type of investment needed to provide modern energy to the billions of the world’s poor that do not have it.

World Energy Outlook 2010

The world appears to be emerging from the worst economic crisis in decades. Many countries have made pledges under the Copenhagen Accord to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. Commitments have also been made by the G20 and APEC to phase out inefficient fossil-fuel subsidies. Are we, at last, on the path to a secure, reliable and environmentally sustainable energy system?

Updated projections of energy demand, production, trade and investment, fuel by fuel and region by region to 2035 are provided in the 2010 edition of the World Energy Outlook (WEO). It includes, for the first time, a new scenario that anticipates future actions by governments to meet the commitments they have made to tackle climate change and growing energy insecurity.

World Energy Outlook 2009

Since WEO-2008, the economic downturn has led to a drop in energy use, CO2 emissions and energy investment. Is this an opportunity to arrest climate change or a threat that any economic upturn might be stifled at birth? 

What package of commitments and measures should the climate negotiators at Copenhagen put together if they really want to stop global temperatures rising? How much would it cost? And how much might the developed world have to pay to finance action elsewhere?

How big is the gas resource base and what is the typical pattern of production from a gas field? What does the unconventional gas boom in the United States mean for the rest of the world? Are we headed for a global gas glut? What role will gas play in the future energy mix? And how might the way gas is priced change?

World Energy Outlook 2008

Are world oil and gas supplies under threat? How could a new international accord on stabilising greenhouse-gas emissions affect global energy markets? World Energy Outlook 2008 answers these and other burning questions.

WEO-2008 draws on the experience of another turbulent year in energy markets to provide new energy projections to 2030, region by region and fuel by fuel. It incorporates the latest data and policies.

WEO-2008 focuses on two pressing issues facing the energy sector today:

• Prospects for oil and gas production: How much oil and gas exists and how much can be produced? Will investment be adequate? Through field-by-field analysis of production trends at 800 of the world’s largest oilfields, an assessment of the potential for finding and developing new reserves and a bottom-up analysis of upstream costs and investment, WEO-2008 takes a hard look at future global oil and gas supply.

• Post-2012 climate scenarios: What emissions limits might emerge from current international negotiations on climate change? What role could cap-and-trade and sectoral approaches play in moving to a low-carbon energy future? Two different scenarios are assessed, one in which the atmospheric concentration of emissions is stabilised at 550 parts per million (ppm) in CO2 equivalent terms and the second at the still more ambitious level of 450 ppm. The implications for energy demand, prices, investment, air pollution and energy security are fully spelt out. This groundbreaking analysis will enable policy makers to distill the key choices as they strive to agree in Copenhagen in 2009 on a post-Kyoto climate framework.

With extensive data, detailed projections and in-depth analysis, WEO-2008 provides invaluable insights into the prospects for the global energy market and what they mean for climate change. 

World Energy Outlook 2007

• In a world where big differences in regional energy prices impact competitiveness, who are the potential winners and losers? 
• Huge volumes of oil are needed to meet growing demand and offset declines in existing fields. Where will it all come from?
• What could trigger a rapid convergence in natural gas prices between Asia, Europe and North America, and how would it affect energy markets?
• Is the growth in renewable energy self-sustaining and is it sufficient to put us on track to meet global climate goals? 
• How much progress is being made in phasing out fossil-fuel subsidies and expanding access to modern energy services to the world’s poor?

The answers to these and many other questions are found in WEO-2013, which covers the prospects for all energy sources, regions and sectors to 2035. Oil is analysed in-depth: resources, production, demand, refining and international trade. Energy efficiency – a major factor in the global energy balance – is treated in much the same way as conventional fuels: Its prospects and contribution are presented in a dedicated chapter. And the report examines the outlook for Brazil’s energy sector in detail and the implications for the global energy landscape.

World Energy Outlook 2006

Two visions of the energy future:

• under-invested, vulnerable and dirty, or
• clean, clever and competitive

Both are explored in this new edition of the authoritative World Energy Outlook. Two visions of the energy future: - under-invested, vulnerable and dirty, or - clean, clever and competitive. Both are explored in this new edition of the authoritative World Energy Outlook.

In it, the International Energy Agency responds to the remit of the G8 world leaders by mapping a new energy future, contrasting it with where we are now headed. WEO 2006 shows how to change course. It counts the costs and benefits - and the benefits win.  World Energy Outlook 2006 also answers these questions:

• Is the economic reaction to high energy prices merely delayed?
• Is oil and gas investment on track?
• Are the conditions shaping up for a nuclear energy revival?
• Can biofuels erode the oil monopoly in road transport?
• Can 2.5 billion people in developing countries switch to modern energy for cooking?
• Is Brazil learning new lessons or teaching the world?

With extensive statistics, detailed projections, analysis and advice, WEO-2006 equips policy makers and the public to re-make the energy future. 

World Energy Outlook 2005

World Energy Outlook 2004

World Energy Outlook 2003

World Energy Outlook 2002 : Part 1 | Part 2

World Energy Outlook 2001

World Energy Outlook 2000

World Energy Outlook 1999

World Energy Outlook 1998

World Energy Outlook 1996

World Energy Outlook 1995

World Energy Outlook 1994

There was no WEO published in 1990.  The World Energy Outlook was published in 1977, 1982, 1993 - 1996, 1998 onwards annually.  1999 onwards can be found on iLibrary in PDF, and 1994 through to 1998 (minus 1997 because there was no WEO in 1997). 

Our work on WEO