Search:

Subject:

Mailing List:

Register here for the IEA Mailing List. If you want to receive an e-mail message as soon as a new IEA Publication is out.



What is RSS?

IEA Publications on 'Investment'

More info about this title World Energy Outlook 2014, 748 pages, ISBN 978-92-64-20804-9, paper €150, PDF €120 (2014)
Special discounts:
- 30% discount for universities and non-profit organisations
- 50% discount for clients based in low income and lower middle income countries For your special discount to be set up please click on ASK FOR A DISCOUNT and follow the procedure. Please do not place your order before receiving your confirmation e-mail.

Please note that we also offer the "corporate/institutional package" and the "global corporate/institutional package" which are the options to make the PDF version of the book available to all employees. For more information, please contact us at weo@iea.org.


The global energy landscape is evolving at a rapid pace, reshaping long-held expectations for our energy future. The 2014 edition of the World Energy Outlook will incorporate all the latest data and developments to produce a comprehensive and authoritative analysis of medium- and longer-term energy trends, with projections for the first time extended to 2040. It will complement a full set of energy projections with strategic insights into their meaning for energy security, the economy and the environment. Oil, natural gas, coal, renewables and energy efficiency will be covered, along with updates on trends in energy-related CO2 emissions, fossil-fuel and renewable energy subsidies, and universal access to modern energy services. The WEO-2014 will also provide in-depth analysis of some topical energy sector issues:

- Energy sector investment: The analysis will provide a detailed assessment of current flows and future investment needs along the entire energy value chain, examining the scale of investment required and financing options. The report will also show how barriers to investment vary according to the strength of decarbonisation policies. (WEO Special Report released 3 June)

- Africa: This continent-wide focus, paying particular attention to the energy outlook for sub-Saharan Africa, will include data and projections for the entire region as well as for its key energy-producing and consuming countries. Key elements for analysis will be the prospects for improving access to modern energy services and for developing the region’s huge resource potential in a way that contributes not only to regional and global energy balances but also to local economic and social well-being. (WEO Special Report released 13 October)

- Nuclear power: Uncertainties continue to cloud the future for nuclear – government policy, public confidence, financing in liberalised markets, competitiveness versus other sources of generation and the looming retirement of a large fleet of older plants. The study will assess the outlook for nuclear power and its implications.
More info about this title Medium-Term Renewable Energy Market Report 2014 -- Market Analysis and Forecasts to 2020, 260 pages, ISBN 978-92-64-21821-5, paper €100, PDF €80 (2014)
In 2013, renewable power capacity expanded at its fastest pace to date. Renewable power generation continued to grow strongly, reaching almost 22% of the global mix, compared with 21% in 2012 and 18% in 2007. Globally, renewable electricity generation is now on par with that of natural gas, which remained relatively stable in 2013. Investment in new renewable power capacity topped USD 250 billion globally in 2013 and is likely to remain at high levels.

Nevertheless, policy and market risks increasingly cloud the development picture, raising concerns over how fast renewables can scale up to meet long-term deployment objectives. Just when renewables are becoming a cost-competitive option in an increasing number of cases, policy uncertainty is rising in some key OECD markets. Renewables continue to spread in emerging markets, where fast-growing power demand and diversification needs provide strong deployment drivers. Still, barriers to development remain in a number of non-OECD areas, including China. As a result, despite strong anticipated generation growth, renewable power capacity additions and investment are expected to level off through 2020. Meanwhile, biofuels for transport and renewables for heat continue to grow, though at slower rates than renewable electricity and with persistent policy challenges.

The Medium-Term Renewable Energy Market Report 2014 assesses market trends for renewables in the electricity, transport and heat sectors, identifying drivers and challenges to deployment, and making projections through 2020. The report presents for the first time an investment outlook for renewable power capacity, in addition to projections for renewable electricity technologies, a global biofuels supply forecast and extended analysis of final energy use of renewables for heat.
More info about this title Medium-Term Gas Market Report 2014 -- Market Analysis and Forecasts to 2019, 212 pages, ISBN 978-92-64-21153-7, paper €100, PDF €80 (2014)
Type: Studies
Subject: Natural Gas ; Statistics ; Industry ; Investment
Global natural gas demand grew just 1.2% in 2013, underperforming other fuels, because of a slow economy, supply constraints, sluggish LNG trade, and competition from coal and renewables in the power sector. Growth in non-OECD countries, which had buoyed global demand over the past decade, retreated to nearly the same pace as in OECD countries. Without the effect of colder weather in OECD countries, demand there would have actually fallen and global demand would have been unchanged.

The IEA Medium-Term Gas Market Report 2014 gives a detailed analysis of demand, supply and trade developments as well as infrastructure investments to meet the 2.2% annual growth in gas demand expected through 2019. It investigates the important changes that will transform the industry: rising regional disparities between gas-hungry regions such as China and the Middle East against weakening growth in the Former Soviet Union (FSU) and Europe; competition between FSU supplies and LNG from the United States and Australia, notably in Europe and Asia; the shift towards net imports in non-OECD Asia and Latin America; and uncertainty over whether Europe can ease its dependency on Russian gas. Besides enhanced coverage of gas in the power sector, this year’s report features special focuses on the potential of gas in maritime transport; the competition between oil and gas to meet fast-growing power consumption in the Middle East; the implications of Iran’s possible return to the international gas scene; and the interplay of natural gas liquids and natural gas in the United States.