Lighting

In recent years, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have drastically changed the lighting market, with a rapid product adoption rate in many markets and important energy savings. Quality LED lamps last longer, and offer comparable or better light quality than other types of lighting. The cost of LED lighting has also dropped steadily. High-efficiency LEDs represented 15% of total residential lamp sales in 2015 (ETP, 2017).


LED lightbulb price trend and annual global energy savings, 2010-16

Lighting-Subtopic

 
Source: Energy Efficiency 2016


Publications

25 Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations - 2011 Update

The IEA recommends that G8 leaders adopt and urgently implement this package of measures to significantly enhance energy efficiency. This package was developed under the Gleneagles G8 Plan of Action, which mandates the pursuit of a clean, clever and competitive energy future. The IEA recommends that G8 leaders adopt and urgently implement this package of measures to significantly enhance energy efficiency. This package was developed under the Gleneagles G8 Plan of Action, which mandates the pursuit of a clean, clever and competitive energy future.

India’s UJALA story – Energy Efficient Prosperity

The EESL’s Unnat Jyoti by Affordable LEDs for All (UJALA, meaning Light in Hindi), is the world’s largest domestic lighting replacement programme. By 2019, UJALA aims to replace 770 million old wasteful lamps with modern, efficient and longer lasting LED lamps, without the need for any government subsidies.

By November 2017, more than 270 million LED bulbs had been delivered across the country. UJALA’s LED bulbs cost about 50 INR and UJALA allows the consumers to buy them for an initial payment of 10 INR, and the balance is paid through the consumer’s electricity bills in equal monthly instalments of 10 INR.

Phase Out of Incandescent Lamps

Since early 2007 almost all OECD and many non-OECD governments have announced policies aimed at phasing-out incandescent lighting within their jurisdictions. This study considers the implications of these policy developments in terms of demand for regulatory compliant lamps and the capacity and motivation of the lamp industry to produce efficient lighting products in sufficient volume to meet future demand. To assess these issues, it reviews the historic international screw-based lamp market, describes the status of international phase-out policies and presents projections of anticipated market responses to regulatory requirements to determine future demand for CFLs.

Barriers to Technology Diffusion: The Case of Compact Fluorescent Lamps

Despite its considerable potential in household, domestic and industry sectors, the possible contribution of solar heat is often neglected in many academic and institutional energy projections and scenarios. This is best explained by the frequent failure to distinguish heat and work as two different forms of energy transfers. 

As a result, policy makers in many countries or States have tended to pay lesser attention to solar thermal technologies than to other renewable energy technologies.

Light's Labour’s Lost

In 1879 the incandescent lamp set a new standard in energy-efficient lighting technology, but today good-quality compact fluorescent lamps need only onequarter of the power to provide the same amount of light. Yet most of us continue to rely on the “horse” of the incandescent lamp instead of the “internal combustion engine” of the compact fluorescent lamp. Despite having many higher-efficiency and lower-cost alternatives, we continue to use less efficient and more expensive lighting technologies.

Is this because we are inherently attached to these older technologies, or is it simply because we stick to what we know when unaware or unsure of the merits of the alternatives? In each of the main lighting end-use sectors (commercial buildings, households, industrial lighting, outdoor lighting and vehicle lighting), this book shows that not only do more cost-effective and higherefficiency alternative choices exist, but that they could be deployed very quickly were the current market barriers to be addressed. Doing this would allow our economies to be stronger and cleaner without sacrificing anything in our quality of life.

Collaboration

The breadth and coverage of analytical expertise in the IEA Technology Collaboration Programmes (TCPs) are unique assets that underpin IEA efforts to support innovation for energy security, economic growth and environmental protection.

Find out more about individual programmes below.

Related material

Energy Technology Perspectives

21st Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling Workshop

Energy Efficiency Training Week

Our work on Energy efficiency