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29 February 2012, Reuters

International Energy Agency's chief economist Fatih Birol said on Wednesday he believed Iraq could achieve a production target of 6.5 million bpd by 2015 but that it could take up to 20 years to increase it to 8 million bpd. "Many Iraqi interlocutors I met are talking about 6.5 million bpd by 2015 and I don't think that this is an unrealistic target, but of course many challenges remain," Birol told Reuters in an interview. Birol was in Iraq to meet oil officials and industry experts ahead of a big IEA report on Iraq due in Nov. 2012. "We have projected that Iraq production can come to around 8 million bpd in the next 20 years. That can be higher and lower depending on global oil markets," he said. "If this 8 million bpd - which as I said is the highest growth among all the producing countries - doesn't take place, we will definitely be in difficulty ... in terms of tightness in global oil markets," he said.

27 February 2012, Logistics Manager, United Kingdom

The chief economist of the International Energy Agency, Fatih Birol, and the former German environmental minister and director of the UN environmental program Klaus Töpfer, were on a supervisory panel of a new study by Deutsche Post DHL: “Delivering Tomorrow: Logistics 2050”. The study, which unveiled five visions of the future and their impact on trade, business and society, was compiled by 42 industry experts from organisations such as the World Economic Forum, the Rocky Mountain Institute, the Copenhagen Institute for Futures Studies, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and Greenpeace International.

26 February 2012, Caixin, China

A groundswell of public opposition to shale gas drilling in Europe, driven by legitimate environmental concerns, is a major problem for what could prove to be a very important industry, said the Chief Economist of the International Energy Agency, Fatih Birol, Wednesday in a telephone interview with Dow Jones Newswires. "In many countries there is public opposition and in some countries it is already banned," Birol said. Concerns about the impact of shale gas production on drinking water are legitimate, but can be solved using the best technology and the right regulation, he said. The current regulatory regime in Europe is not adequate, that is why the IEA is convening a meeting in Warsaw, Poland, Wednesday to discuss best environmental practices with the industry and policymakers, Birol said. The IEA plans to publish a report with recommendations for best practice on shale gas drilling on May 29.

21 February 2012, Financial Times

“Just a couple of years ago, the development of unconventional gas was a silent revolution taking place in the United States, but it is now having widespread effects on global energy markets," the Chief Economist of the International Energy Agency, Fatih Birol, noted. "The prospects for gas demand, pricing and trade patterns have all shifted significantly and there is now a surge of interest from countries all around the world in improving their security of supply through exploitation of unconventional gas." But "there are always two sides to a coin," Birol warned. "While the process of hydraulic fracturing has been around for decades, the rapid increase in the number of wells […] and the large number of companies who drill them has been accompanied by growing concerns about the environmental effects of the exploitation of unconventional resources. Land use, water scarcity, pollution of water supplies and greenhouse gas emissions are increasingly being scrutinized." Birol said the environmental concerns need to be addressed, but the benefits of this new natural gas production are significant, particularly as natural gas increasingly replaces coal in the energy mix, lowering carbon emissions.

12 February 2012, Chosun Ilbo, Korea

International Energy Agencys chief economist Fatih Birol said on Wednesday he believed Iraq could achieve a production target of 6.5 million bpd by 2015 but that it could take up to 20 years to increase it to 8 million bpd. "Many Iraqi interlocutors I met are talking about 6.5 million bpd by 2015 and I dont think that this is an unrealistic target, but of course many challenges remain," Birol told Reuters in an interview. Birol was in Iraq to meet oil officials and industry experts ahead of a big IEA report on Iraq due in Nov. 2012. "We have projected that Iraq production can come to around 8 million bpd in the next 20 years. That can be higher and lower depending on global oil markets," he said. "If this 8 million bpd - which as I said is the highest growth among all the producing countries - doesnt take place, we will definitely be in difficulty ... in terms of tightness in global oil markets," he said.

10 February 2012, Trade Arabia

The chief economist of the International Energy Agency, Fatih Birol, and the former German environmental minister and director of the UN environmental program Klaus Töpfer, were on a supervisory panel of a new study by Deutsche Post DHL: “Delivering Tomorrow: Logistics 2050”. The study, which unveiled five visions of the future and their impact on trade, business and society, was compiled by 42 industry experts from organisations such as the World Economic Forum, the Rocky Mountain Institute, the Copenhagen Institute for Futures Studies, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development and Greenpeace International.

3 February 2012, Russia Today

In an interview with Caixin, the Chief Economist of the International Energy Agency, Dr. Birol spells out the obstacles China faces in securing oil supplies, the need for it to improve energy efficiency, the challenges for alternative energy in the country, as well as the impact of geopolitics on the world’s oil supply. To read the full interview, click here.

31 January 2012, Bloomberg BNA

Major Middle Eastern oil producers will step in to fill any gap caused by supply shortages this year, the IEAs chief economist Fatih Birol said today in Seoul, while global energy demand will eventually recover from a fall caused by economic slowdown. Oil demand is falling for the first time since the global economic crisis of 2008-2009, the International Energy Agency, which advises industrial countries on energy policy, said in January. It cut its 2012 demand growth forecast by 220,000 barrels per day from its previous monthly report to 1.1 million bpd. "We may see a slowing down of global energy demand this year because of the slowing down of the economy," Birol said. "But well still see global growth in demand (in the longer term), unless we see a major recession from European countries."

29 January 2012, Forbes

Presenting the latest World Energy Outlook in Seoul on Friday, IEA Chief Economist Fatih Birol said that “in the aftermath of Fukushima, there is a temporary shift away from nuclear, but it is inevitable that nuclear energy will expand in the future in order to address energy security and climate change”. He warned, however, that “due to the economic situation, discussion on investment in energy, in particular nuclear energy, has taken a back seat”. Looking ahead, Dr. Birol stressed that “we also need to look at the direction in which China will head, especially in the transport sector."

26 January 2012, National Geographic

Russia will remain China and India’s corner stone for energy for many years, said Fatih Birol, Chief Economist at the International Energy Agency, today in Moscow. But it needs to invest more into the industry and learn to save energy. “Russia is going through the best times in terms of energy, last year Russia made about $300 billion out of oil and gas”, says Birol. He believes the nuclear accident in Japan and the ‘Arab Spring’ proved how essential the country is to the global energy system. However, it needs to adapt to the changing consumption landscape. “All the energy demand will come from four countries: China, China, China and India,” Birol says. “Economic growth is there and the population is there.” But to meet the increasingly hungry eastern clients Russia needs to invest more in the industry. Mr. Birol estimates an additional $100 billion is needed, which could be spent on developing regions difficult to geological exploration. Yet, he adds the government should also create favourable tax regimes to attract companies into these areas.