Country:Sweden
Year:1995
Policy status:In Force
Jurisdiction:National
Date Effective:1995
Policy Type:Regulatory Instruments>Codes and standards
Energy Efficiency Policy Targets:Buildings, Building Code, Energy performance, Buildings, New buildings
Climate Change Policy Targets:Buildings, Residential, Buildings, Buildings, Non-Residential
Agency:Swedish Board of Housing, Building and Planning (Boverket)
URL:http://www.boverket.se/
Legal References:BBR 24, BFS 2016:13
Evaluation:Energy use in buildings - report to the evaluation of Good Built Environment 2007: available in Swedish on on URL
Energy Efficiency Description:

Building regulations (BFS 1993:57) aim to ensure that newly constructed buildings meeting essential technical requirements as well as environmental goals, such as that of a "Good built environment." Regarding energy use, building regulations require new construction to limit energy use through low heat losses, low cooling requirements, and efficient heating, cooling and electricity usage. The building's energy use is defined as the energy supplied over the course of an average year for heating, cooling, hot water, the operation of installations such as pumps and fans, as well as other electricity needs other than those for operations or household appliances. The building regulations underwent a major revision in  January 2012 (BBR19) and updated in 2016. Sweden is divided into four climate zones, with somewhat differing requirements for energy use. Figures here refer to climate zone III, which includes Stockholm and Gothenburg. Buildings for housing purposes heated by other means than electricity are allowed a maximum energy use of 90 kWh/m2 (if heated by electricity, 55 kWh/m2). For commercial space the corresponding figures are 70 and 50, respectively). In 2015 a separate climate zone was established which encompasses the southernmost parts of the country with lower maximum values for energy use.

Climate Change Description:

Building regulations (BFS 1993:57) aim to ensure that newly constructed buildings meeting essential technical requirements as well as environmental goals, such as that of a "Good built environment." Regarding energy use, building regulations require new construction to limit energy use through low heat losses, low cooling requirements, and efficient heating, cooling and electricity usage. The buildings energy use is defined as the energy supplied over the course of an average year for heating, cooling, hot water, the operation of installations such as pumps and fans, as well as other electricity needs other than those for operations or household appliances. The building regulations were revised 1 July 2006 (with a transition period until June 2007). The revision replaced criteria for energy efficiency as separate components by a single metric for the buildings energy performance, expressed in kWh per square metre per year. The revision was primarily aimed at increasing the ability to verify energy demand and improve clarity on energy usage. As the new regulation includes follow-up requirements, it is expected to increase the compliance rate. From 1 April 2008, the demands on all buildings heated with direct electric heating have been strengthened. The current requirement imposes a maximum yearly energy use limit of 110 kWh/m2 (Atemp) per year in the southern climate zone, and 130 kWh/m2 (Atemp) per year in the northern climate zone. Buildings using electric heating are only allowed to use 75 kWh/m2 (Atemp) per year in the southern climate zone and 95 kWh/m2 (Atemp) in the northern climate zone. The regulations are valid for newly constructed buildings. For renovations there are no binding rules, but some recommendations exist on energy efficiency and heating insulation.

 

Related policies:Building Energy Performance Certificates

Last modified: Wed, 31 May 2017 14:27:35 CEST