Energy Sector
Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

European Commission - Eurostat
The energy sector covers the amount of fuels used by the energy producing industries (e.g. for heating, lighting and operation of all equipment used in the extraction process, for traction and for distribution).

Energy producing industries’ own use includes energy consumed by transformation industries for heating, pumping, traction and lighting purposes (ISIC Divisions 10, 11, 12, 23 and 40).

The main energy producing categories include fuel mining and extraction, petroleum refineries, electricity, CHP and heat plants, pumped storage and others.

Fuel mining and extraction includes both coal mining and oil and gas extraction. For hard coal and lignite mining, this represents the energy which is used directly within the coal industry. It excludes coal burned in pithead power stations (defined as electricity plants in the transformation sector) and free allocations to miners and their families (considered as part of household consumption and therefore defined as residential). For oil and gas extraction, flared gas in not included.

Other energy sectors include own consumption in patent fuel plants, coke ovens gas works, blast furnaces, BKB and lignite coke plants, coal liquefaction plants, gas-to-liquids plants, charcoal production plants, nuclear plants as well as use in non-specified energy sector.

Note: Fuels transformed into another energy form are considered part of the transformation sector. Fuel used in support of the operation of pipelines (oil, gas and coal slurries) are considered part of the transport sector.

International Energy Agency (IEA)
The energy sector covers the amount of fuels used by the energy producing industries (e.g. for heating, lighting and operation of all equipment used in the extraction process, for traction and for distribution).

Energy producing industries’ own use includes energy consumed by transformation industries for heating, pumping, traction and lighting purposes (ISIC Divisions 10, 11, 12, 23 and 40).

The main energy producing categories include fuel mining and extraction, petroleum refineries, electricity, CHP and heat plants, pumped storage and others.

Fuel mining and extraction includes both coal mining and oil and gas extraction. For hard coal and lignite mining, this represents the energy which is used directly within the coal industry. It excludes coal burned in pithead power stations (defined as electricity plants in the transformation sector) and free allocations to miners and their families (considered as part of household consumption and therefore defined as residential). For oil and gas extraction, flared gas in not included.

Other energy sectors include own consumption in patent fuel plants, coke ovens gas works, blast furnaces, BKB and lignite coke plants, coal liquefaction plants, gas-to-liquids plants, charcoal production plants, nuclear plants as well as use in non-specified energy sector.

Note: Fuels transformed into another energy form are considered part of the transformation sector. Fuel used in support of the operation of pipelines (oil, gas and coal slurries) are considered part of the transport sector.

Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE)
Self consumption is one of the four possible paths for total supply. Self–consumption is the part of primary and secondary energy that the energy sector itself uses for its operations.

Note:
Be careful to distinguish self–consumption from transformation or recycling: note that while the latter two are raw materials that are transformed into a new energy source, self–consumption is simply “transformed” into useful energy such heat, mechanical force, light, etc.

Example:
The fuel oil that feeds the boiler of a power plant is recycled while fuel oil burned in the crude oil furnace of a refinery is self–consumption.

United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)
The energy sector covers the amount of fuels used by the energy producing industries (e.g. for heating, lighting and operation of all equipment used in the extraction process, for traction and for distribution).

Energy producing industries’ own use includes energy consumed by transformation industries for heating, pumping, traction and lighting purposes (ISIC Divisions 10, 11, 12, 23 and 40).

The main energy producing categories include fuel mining and extraction, petroleum refineries, electricity, CHP and heat plants, pumped storage and others.

Fuel mining and extraction includes both coal mining and oil and gas extraction. For hard coal and lignite mining, this represents the energy which is used directly within the coal industry. It excludes coal burned in pithead power stations (defined as electricity plants in the transformation sector) and free allocations to miners and their families (considered as part of household consumption and therefore defined as residential). For oil and gas extraction, flared gas in not included.

Other energy sectors include own consumption in patent fuel plants, coke ovens gas works, blast furnaces, BKB and lignite coke plants, coal liquefaction plants, gas-to-liquids plants, charcoal production plants, nuclear plants as well as use in non-specified energy sector.

Note: Fuels transformed into another energy form are considered part of the transformation sector. Fuel used in support of the operation of pipelines (oil, gas and coal slurries) are considered part of the transport sector.

UNSD Energy Statistics Section
Consumption by energy sector – comprises the consumption of fuels and electricity used by the energy producing industries, e.g. for heating, lighting, and operation of all equipment used in the extraction process, for traction and distribution. It includes the quantities consumed in compression stations and pumping stations of oil and gas pipelines, as well as the station use and loss of electric power plants (including electricity used for pumping at pumped storage installations).