Biodiesel
Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

European Commission - Eurostat
This category includes biodiesel (a methyl-ester produced from vegetable or animal oil, of diesel quality), biodimethylether (dimethylether produced from biomass), Fischer Tropsch (Fischer Tropsch produced from biomass), cold pressed biooil (oil produced from oil seed through mechanical processing only) and all other liquid biofuels which are added to, blended with or used straight as transport diesel.

International Energy Agency (IEA)
This category includes biodiesel (a methyl-ester produced from vegetable or animal oil, of diesel quality), biodimethylether (dimethylether produced from biomass), Fischer Tropsch (Fischer Tropsch produced from biomass), cold pressed biooil (oil produced from oil seed through mechanical processing only) and all other liquid biofuels which are added to, blended with or used straight as transport diesel.

United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)
This category includes biodiesel (a methyl-ester produced from vegetable or animal oil, of diesel quality), biodimethylether (dimethylether produced from biomass), Fischer Tropsch (Fischer Tropsch produced from biomass), cold pressed biooil (oil produced from oil seed through mechanical processing only) and all other liquid biofuels which are added to, blended with or used straight as transport diesel.

UNSD Energy Statistics Section
It refers to oil derived from biological sources and modified chemically so that it can be used as fuel in compression ignition (diesel) internal combustion engines, or for heating. Biological sources of biodiesel include, but are not limited to, vegetable oils made from canola (rapeseed), soybeans, corn, oil palm, peanut, or sunflower. Chemically, biodiesel is a linear alkyl ester made by transesterification of vegetable oils or animal fats with methanol. The transesterification distinguishes biodiesel from straight vegetable and waste oils. Straight oils can be used as fuel only in if the engine is modified; for this reason, it is not recommended to report them as biodiesel. Biodiesel has a flash point of around 150C and a density of 0.86 kg/liter. When burned, some of the emissions (sulfur, carbon monoxide, and aromatic hydrocarbons) are lower than that of petroleum-derived gas-diesel oil, while some are higher (nitrogen oxides, particulate matter (sooth)). Biodiesel is biodegradable and non-toxic. It has higher cetane rating than petroleum diesel, with which it is often blended. For example, B20 is a fuel containing 20% of biodiesel and 80% or regular diesel; B100 refers to pure biodiesel.