Charcoal
Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC)

European Commission - Eurostat
This covers the solid residue of the destructive distillation and pyrolysis of wood and other vegetal material.

Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO)
Charcoal: Refers to a solid residue derived from the carbonization, distillation, pyrolysis and torrefaction of wood (trunks and branches of trees) and wood by-products, using continuous or batch systems (pit, brick and metal kilns). It also includes charcoal briquettes.

Charcoal briquettes: made from wood-based charcoal which, after crushing and drying, is moulded (often under high pressure), generally with the admixture of binders to form artefacts of even shape.

International Energy Agency (IEA)
This covers the solid residue of the destructive distillation and pyrolysis of wood and other vegetal material.

Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE)
Firewood charcoal is produced in charcoal ovens with firewood as a raw material. In most countries, charcoal ovens are very rudimentary furnaces installed at the time and place where firewood is found, then later abandoned as the raw material becomes scarcer.

This fuel is obtained from the destructive distilling of wood in absence of oxygen, in charcoal plants. This product absorbs humidity rapidly, and often contains 10 to 15 % water, besides 0.5 to 1.0 % hydrogen and 2 to 3 % ash, with lower caloric power of around 6,500 Kcal / Kg. These characteristics may vary according to the quality of the firewood of origin. In some cases it can substitute coke in foundry processes, and be consumed in industries such as brick making, and in the residential sector for cooking.

United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE)
This covers the solid residue of the destructive distillation and pyrolysis of wood and other vegetal material.

UNSD Energy Statistics Section
Solid residue, consisting mainly of carbon, obtained by the destructive distillation of wood in the absence of air.